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About me

I am a Senior Researcher working in the G. K. Batchelor Fluid Dynamics Laboratory located in the Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics (DAMTP) at the University of Cambridge.

Bio

2022 - date   

Senior Research Associate

DAMTP, University of Cambridge

2019 - date   

Leverhulme Fellow

DAMTP, University of Cambridge

2019 - date

College Lecturer

Magdalene College, Cambridge

2018 - 2019

EPSRC Doctoral Prize Fellow

DAMTP, University of Cambridge

2014 - 2018

PhD in Applied Mathematics (under Prof P. F. Linden)

DAMTP, University of Cambridge

2013 - 2014

MSc in Fluid Mechanics (including 6-month thesis research under Dr C. Muller & Prof J. M. Chomaz)

École Polytechnique (France)

2012 - 2013

International Exchange (1 year, including 6-month thesis research under Prof D. Saintillan)

University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign (USA)

2011

Industrial internship (6 months, German-spoken)

German Aerospace Centre, Stuttgart (Germany)

2010

International Exchange (5 months, German-taught)

Technical University of Vienna (Austria)

2008 - 2013

MSc in Mechanical Engineering (Diplôme d'Ingénieur)

Université de Technologie de Compiègne (France)

Research funding

2023-28   

Natural Environment Research Council (NERC): Independent Research Fellowship (~£700,000)

Lecturer-level fellowship with equipment funding for 5-year independent research (my proposal received the maximum "Panel Score for Research Leadership Potential" of 10/10)

2021-22   

Royal Society: Research Grant (~£20,000)

Project: “Exploring the early stages of bubble growth and fracture in decompressed hydrogels"
 

2019-23

Leverhulme Trust: Early Career Fellowship (~£160,000)

Highly-competitive (across sciences & humanities) fellowship for 3-year independent research

2018-19

Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC): Doctoral Prize Fellowship (~£45,000)

Competitive one-year postdoctoral funding to maximise impact of PhD (only 1 award in DAMTP)

2015-18
Conference travel grants (£1,550)

from Churchill College and the Cambridge Philosophical Society (5 grants in total)

Awards & Honours

2022
‘Focus on Fluids’ Article

from the Journal of Fluid Mechanics
This 2nd author paper was selected (out of ~120/month) for a dedicated review explaining its impact

2021

Journal Front Cover

from Soft Matter (Royal Society of Chemistry)  
For the “highest-quality” papers which are “very well received by the reviewers and editors”

 

2020
Silver Medal for Mathematics (£1,250)

from the UK Parliamentary and Scientific Committee

‘STEM for Britain’ poster competition for early-career scientists to showcase research to MPs


2019
Dissertation Prize (£500)  

from the UK Fluids Network

“Best fluid-mechanics-themed PhD thesis submitted to a UK university in 2018” (1/year in UK)

 

2018
Young Scientist Award (€500)

from the European Fluid Mechanics Conference (EUROMECH)           

One of the two awards for best oral presentation in biennial conference (~850 participants)

 

2018
‘Focus on Fluids’ Article

from the Journal of Fluid Mechanics
This 1st author paper was selected (out of ~100/month) for a dedicated review explaining its impact

 

2017
Osborne Reynolds Award (£500)

from the EU Research Community on Flow, Turbulence and Combustion (ERCOFTAC)
First oral presentation prize in annual UK competition for young fluids researchers (~80 entries)

 

2016

Smith-Rayleigh-Knight Prize (£100)

from the Faculty of Mathematics (Cambridge)
Maths prize based on an essay submitted during the second year of PhD research

Some inspiring quotes

“They became upright and taught themselves the use of tools, domesticated other animals, plants and fire, and devised language. The ash of stellar alchemy was now emerging into consciousness. At an ever-accelerating pace, it invented writing, cities, art and science, and sent spaceships to the planets and the stars. These are some of the things that hydrogen atoms do, given fifteen billion years of cosmic evolution.” -- Carl Sagan (Cosmos, 1980)

“Empirical sciences, founded on observation of the external world, cannot aspire to completeness; the nature of things and the imperfections of our organs are alike opposed to it. We shall never succeed in exhausting the inexhaustible riches of nature, and no generation of men will ever be able to boast of having comprehended all phaenomena. It is only by distributing them into groups, that we have been able to discover in some the empires of laws, grand and simple as Nature herself.“ -- Alexander von Humboldt (Cosmos Vol. I, 1845)

Any branch  of knowledge, cultivated by itself, not only does not suffice for itself, but presents dangers that all sensible men have recognised. Mathematics in isolation warps judgment, accustoming it to a rigor that no other science has, still less real life. Physics and chemistry obsess you by their complexity and give no breadth to the mind. Physiology leads to materialism; astronomy to vague speculation; geology turns you into a sniffing hound; literature makes you hollow; philosophy inflates you [...] You must pass from one discipline to the other so as to correct one by the other; you must cross your crops in order not to ruin the soil. -- Antonin-Dalmace Sertillanges (The Intellectual Life: Its Spirit, Condition, Methods, 1921)

“It is one of the first duties of a professor, for example, in any subject, to exaggerate a little both the importance of his subject and his own importance in it. A man who is always asking ‘Is what I do worth while?’ and ‘Am I the right person to do it?’ will always be ineffective himself and a discouragement to others. He must shut his eyes a little and think a little more of his subject and himself than they deserve.” -- Godfrey Harold Hardy (A Mathematician's Apology, 1940)